Hugh McNulty

M, (1820 - 1903)
RelationshipGreat-grandfather of Helen Frances Gerber McCarthy
ChartsHelen Gerber ancestors
McNulty/Tracy family
Birth*20 Nov 1820 Donegal, Ireland1 
Marriage*1851 Arderth, Fermanagh, Ireland; Bride=Isabella Tracy McNulty1 
Death*13 Mar 1903 Woodstock, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US)1 
Burial*15 Mar 1903 Calvary Cemetery, Woodstock, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US)2 
Note*19 Mar 1903 obituary Woodstock (Illinois) Sentinel, Thursday 19 March 1903. 
Biography* Hugh McNulty, 1820-1903:
There are inconsistencies and unresolved questions in the story of Hugh McNulty. He was born in 1820 on either 20 October or 20 November in County Donegal, Ireland and, at some time, served in the English army. He married Isabella Tracy in 1851 with whom he produced three children. Hugh emigrated Ireland alone in 1866 and sailed from Liverpool, England, on the steamship Marathon arriving at the Port of New York on the 4th of June in that year. Wife Isabelle and daughter Susan followed a few months later. The family settled in McHenry County, Illinois where they lived in and around the city of Woodstock. Hugh worked as a laborer and later as a farmer. There is also evidence that he may have worked for a railroad early on.3 In his death certificate, Hugh was listed as a "contractor." Hugh did not take steps to become a citizen of the United States until 18 years after he arrived. Very untypical! Most immigrant men became citizens as soon as possible so they could vote.

Hugh signed a declaration of intent to naturalize on 3 November 1884 in County Court of McHenry County, Illinois. The year before his declaration, on 10 November 1883, Hugh bought a small farm of six-and-a-quarter acres in Dorr Township outside of Woodstock from G. T. Barrows and others.4 In late 1900 or early 1901, Hugh and Isabella left the farm and moved to Hebron Township where they lived with son-in-law Edward Clancy. On 24 November 1901, Hugh and Isabella sold the property to Marcellus L. Joslyn of Woodstock, McHenry, IL for one dollar. Neither Hugh nor Isabella could sign their name. Grand-daughter Mary Clancy and D. F. Quinlan witnessed their marks.5 Sometime later, Hugh and Isabelle moved into a house on Madison Street in Woodstock.

Hugh, 82, died at home on a Friday evening of bronchitis with the complication of valvular heat demise. He had been attended by Dr. Frederick Page of Woodstock. Hugh was survived by his wife and seven grandchildren. The funeral, conducted by undertaker J. J. Stafford of Woodstock, was held on Sunday from Saint Mary's church in Woodstock with the Rev. Quinn officiating. Believe that Hugh is buried in the Clancy family plot in Calvary Cemetery but he is not listed in the plot record at Saint Mary's and there is no tombstone honoring him on the site. 

Family

Isabella Tracy McNulty (24 Apr 1819-4 Jun 1907)
Children
Last Edited10 Jul 2017

Citations

  1. [S18] Obituary,.
  2. [S66] McHenry county death record.
  3. The claim in his obituary that he helped build the first railroad in Wisconsin is unlikely since most of the track had been laid before he immigrated.
  4. from McHenry County Land Records, Book 75, page 204: H. McNulty received a warranty deed from G. T. Barrows et ux for part of the North East Quarter of the North West Quarter of Section 10, in Town 44 North, of Range 7 East of the 3rd Principal Meridian (Dorr Township) on the north side of the road that leads from R. Greens to Woodstock bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a post at the northeast corner of the above mentioned 40 thence south 7 chains and 60 links to a post on the northeast line of said road - thence north 46 degrees west along the northeast line of said road 2 chains and 42 links - thence north 70.1 degrees west 17 chains & 97 links to a post on quarter section line and 1 chain and 44 links east of the northwest corner of above described 40 - thence east on quarter line 80 chains and 56 links to place of beginning, containing 6.25 acres.
  5. from McHenry County Land Records, Book 103, page 548: Hugh McNulty and wife of Hebron, McHenry County gave a warranty deed for the property to Marcellus L. Joslyn of Woodstock for one dollar.

Isabella Tracy McNulty

F, (1819 - 1907)
RelationshipGreat-grandmother of Helen Frances Gerber McCarthy
ChartsHelen Gerber ancestors
McNulty/Tracy family
Birth*24 Apr 1819 Arderth, Fermanagh, Ireland1 
Marriage*1851 Arderth, Fermanagh, Ireland; Groom=Hugh McNulty1 
Married Name1851 McNulty [Tracy] 
Death*4 Jun 1907 Hebron Tp, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US)1 
Burial*7 Jun 1907 Calvary Cemetery, Woodstock, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US)1 
Note*13 Jun 1907 obituary Woodstock (Illinois) Sentinel, 13 June 1907. 
Biography* Isabella Tracy McNulty, 1819-1907:
"Whistling women and crowing hens - always come to some bad end," with these words Isabella scolded her grand-daughter Mary Clancy, who liked to whistle and was good at it. According to her obituary, Isabella was "... united in marriage in the town of her birth, Arderth county, Fermanagh, Ireland." Even assuming that a comma was misplaced and that the name of the place should read "Arderth, County Fermanagh", we have found no place in County Fermanagh with that name - neither townland, nor town, nor parish. Neither mountain, nor lake, nor river. The most likely place of her birth is a townland in western County Fermanagh called Ardgart.

Ardgart is a small narrow townland on the south side of the western end of Lower Lough Erne. It is at the base of an east-to-west ridge that rises steeply to the south to a height of 288-meters. The townland is in the Catholic parish of Garrison in Clogher Diocese and in the civil parish of Inishmacsaint. It is located about 5-miles east of Belleek on the south side of the road to Enniskillen. There is a chapel in Toura about two-miles west towards Belleek. If Isabella was from Ardgart, Toura is probably where her marriage to Hugh McNulty took place. Unfortunately, Garrison parish records before 1860 don't exist. And the marriage wasn't recorded in any of the surrounding parishes with records that exist for the 1851 timeframe. Isabella immigrated to the U.S.A. with her daughter Susan, four-months after her husband Hugh, arriving at the Port of New York on 30 October 1866 aboard the steamship Hecla. She was 47-years-old.

When Isabella died in 1907 at age 88, her seven grandchildren, ranging in age from 21 to 35 at her death, had all grown up in the area where Isabella herself had lived for over 50 years. Yet, there are no stories or vignettes or descriptions or photographs of her that have survived to the present day except for the story about whistling recounted above. Curious! If family lore is to be taken as truth, Isabella was not a very pleasant person and this may explain the lack of stories involving her. Be that as it may be, I'll always believe that Isabella herself had a hand in leading me to what little we know about her. There is no civil death record for Isabella, nor church funeral record, nor is she memorialized on any tombstone in the various cemeteries in the McHenry County places where the family lived. The search for her death date had been unsuccessful until her obituary was found quite by accident. Or was it an accident? Or maybe something else? While searching a microfilmed 1907 newspaper for the obituary of another McHenry County resident, I stopped advancing the film to check the newspaper date to see if I was close to the date sought and - there - there was Isabella's obituary! Did Isabella guide my hand because she wanted to be found?

Isabella, 88, died at the home of her son-in-law Edward Clancy in Hebron Township on a Tuesday morning. Her funeral was held from Saint Patrick's in Hartland township on Thursday. The Rev. Wills officiated and pall bearers were H. A. Stone, Timothy Nolan, Thomas Coffee, Timothy Leonard, Timothy Sullivan and P. J. Nolan. 

Family

Hugh McNulty (20 Nov 1820-13 Mar 1903)
Children
Last Edited10 Jul 2017

Citations

  1. [S18] Obituary,.

Susan Ann McNulty Clancy

F, (1852 - 1886)
Susan McNulty Clancy,
1852-1886
FatherHugh McNulty (1820 - 1903)
MotherIsabella Tracy McNulty (1819 - 1907)
RelationshipGrandmother of Helen Frances Gerber McCarthy
ChartsHelen Gerber ancestors
Glancy/Carron family
McNulty/Tracy family
Birth*26 Dec 1852 Donegal, Ireland1,2 
Marriage*2 Sep 1871 Saint Patrick's church, Hartland Tp, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US); Groom=Edward Clancy, priest=John Carroll Rev, Witness=D. W. Nowlan, Witness=Margaret Prior3 
Married Name2 Sep 1871 Clancy [McNulty] 
Death*20 Mar 1886 Richmond, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US)1,2 
Burial*22 Mar 1886 Richmond, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US)2 
Burial Calvary Cemetery, Woodstock, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US)4,1 
Note*27 Mar 1886 obituary McHenry County (Illinois) Democrat, Saturday 27 March 1866. 
Biography* Susan McNulty, 1852-1886:
Susan's birth date was calculated from her age at death listed on her tombstone - 33 years 02 months and 23 days. She immigrated to the U.S.A. four-months after her father Hugh, arriving with her mother Isabella at the Port of New York on 30 October 1866 aboard the steamship Hecla. Susan and her father, Hugh McNulty were born in County Donegal, the county west of County Fermanagh where her mother, Isabelle Tracy, was born. Susan had at least one brother, John McNulty, and possibly a second. None of her siblings survived infancy. Haven't found the parish where the McNultys lived as yet. The time frames of Susan's and her siblings's births, the 1850s, may survive in many parish records so it's still possible that we will find them. Don't know if the McNultys knew the Clancys in Ireland but it's certainly possible. In the United States, the family settled in Dorr Township of McHenry County and lived in various places in and around the City of Woodstock. Susan was married in Woodstock on 2 September 1871 by John Carroll, a Catholic priest, before witnesses D. W. Nowlan (sic) and Margaret Prior. The marriage license was obtained in McHenry County by affadavit of Bernard Nolan.

On a Saturday evening, five days after the birth of her eighth child, Susan died at her home a few miles west of Richmond. She was thirty-three. According to her obituary, Susan's funeral was held in Richmond village's Catholic church, with internment in the cemetery next door to the church. In September 1989, there was no tombstone in that cemetery honoring Susan. The church which was next to the cemetery no longer existed. A newer church is located several blocks away. There is a Clancy family plot in Calvary cemetery in Woodstock and a tombstone honoring Susan is located on it. Cemetery records at Saint Mary's in Woodstock list Susan as one of those buried in the plot. An infant that predeceased her by four-years is also listed. If Susan was ever actually buried in Richmond, she was moved to Woodstock some time later. The other seven of her eight children survived her. 

Family

Edward Clancy (Dec 1838-14 Aug 1920)
Children
Last Edited10 Jul 2017

Citations

  1. [S8] Tombstone.
  2. [S18] Obituary,.
  3. [S159] McHenry county marriage record.
  4. [S265] Cemetery record, Calvary Cemetery, Woodstock, Illinois; Woodstock records at Saint Mary's.

Edward Glancy

M, (c 1800 - 1865)
FatherMr. Glancy
Mother(Mrs) (?) Glancy
RelationshipGreat-grandfather of Helen Frances Gerber McCarthy
ChartsHelen Gerber ancestors
Glancy/Carron family
Nickname Ned 
Birth*c 1800 Glenfarne, Leitrim, Ireland1,2 
Marriage*b 1828 Bride=Catherine Carron Clancy3 
Death*7 Oct 1865 Crocknacreevy, Kinawley, Fermanagh, Ireland; Witness=Joseph Clancy1 
Biography* Edward "Ned" Glancy, 1800-1865:
According to family lore, Edward was from Glenfarne, County Leitrim. This seems likely because Clancy is a common surname in County Leitrim while before 1838, when Edward's fifth child was christened in Kinawley, there were no records of any Clancys in County Fermanagh. Circa 1862, prior to Edward's death there were four Clancy families in Fermanagh, and all of them lived near the County Leitrim border. Two of these families, Laurence Clancy and Michael Glancy both lived in Inishmacsaint parish. Laurence in Drumnasreane townland; Michael in Knockarevan. A third family, Terence Clancey lived in Drumbargy, Cleenish parish. And the fourth, our Edward Glancy, lived in Crocknacreevy, Kinawley parish. There is no known connection between these four men but, sometimes, names given to children can shed some light on possible familial connections. It was customary, in those days, to name the first born male after the father's father, the second after the mother's father and the third after the father himself. Later males were named after other relatives - brothers, uncles and cousins. So, if this custom was followed, then Edward's father's name was Patrick, the name given his first born. And since later sons were named Terence and Michael, there may have been a connection between at least three of the Fermanagh Clancys mentioned above.

There is also a strong suggestion of familial connection with christening sponsors. In the case of Edward's children, a Terence Clancy was a sponsor twice, and a James Clancy once. The most likely Terence Clancy relation would be the one mentioned above living in Cleenish Parish. The most likely James Clancy relation would be one of five living in Cloonclare parish, County Leitrim. Most of the names given to Edward's sons were common among Clancys. Patrick, James, and John - names given the first three sons - were very common, Terence, Michael, and Peter - the fifth, sixth, and seventh sons - less so. Edward, however, is a very unusual given name for a Clancy. And Edward himself did not bestow that name on his third born son but his fourth. Some of these names were also common in the mother Catherine Carron's family (see her bio for a discussion of these possibilities).

It seems likely, assuming prevailing custom was followed, that Edward himself was named for someone in his mother's family. There are no clues as to what the mother's surname might have been.

Edward's wife Catherine Carron may have come from Killesher parish the next parish to the west of Kinawley. Presumably, Edward and Catherine were married in her home parish, where ever that was. They may have lived in Glenfarne after their marriage. Maybe until as late as 1838. In which case, up to four of their children may have been born in County Leitrim.

In 1862, Edward occupied "house, office, and land" in Crocknacreevy townland, leased from the Earl of Enniskillen, the immediate lessor (the property is identified as lot 16 on Ordnance Survey maps). The lot consisted of 10 acres plus one rood (one rood = 1/4 acre). The townland consisted of just over 298 acres. The buildings on the Clancy lot were valued, for tax purposes, at 10 shillings (ten shillings = 1/2 pound). There were 21 lots in the townland with buildings, nine of those were valued higher, at 15 shillings, and four others the same, i.e., at 10 shillings. The remaining seven were valued at less than 10 shillings each. The overall average was eleven. The total valuation of Edward's holding, land and buildings, was 12 pounds. The house in which the Clancy family lived had stone walls, a thatch or wood roof and three windows in the front. The interior consisted of three rooms. There were three outbuildings on the property in 1901: a cow shed, a calf shed and a piggery.

Edward died on a Saturday. His funeral was held in Kinawley - the largest held there in four years and which cost 5 pounds. According to family lore, Edward was buried in the Kinawley graveyard but there is no evidence of that. He could have been returned to Glenfarne. No tombstone has been found in either Kinawley or Glenfarne. 

Family

Catherine Carron Clancy (c 1801-11 May 1884)
Children
Last Edited17 Nov 2009

Citations

  1. [S167] Ireland civil death record.
  2. [S1621] Family lore.
  3. [S9] Surmised.

Catherine Carron Clancy

F, (c 1801 - 1884)
FatherMr. Carron
Mother(Mrs) (?) Carron
RelationshipGreat-grandmother of Helen Frances Gerber McCarthy
ChartsHelen Gerber ancestors
Glancy/Carron family
Nickname Kitty 
Birth*c 1801 1 
Marriage*b 1828 Groom=Edward Glancy2 
Married Nameb 1828 Clancy [Carron] 
Death*11 May 1884 Crocknacreevy, Kinawley, Fermanagh, Ireland; Witness=Ellen Martin Clancy1 
Biography* Catherine "Kitty" Carron Clancy, 1801-1884:
The Carrons came to Fermanagh, probably from County Donegal, much earlier than the Clancys. Circa 1830, there were no Carron families in Kinawley parish but there were six Carron families in the neighboring parish of Killesher; James, John, Manus, Philip, William, and Jane. By 1862, the number of Carron families in Killesher had grown from six to eleven: William in Clontyferagh; John, Michael, and Thomas in Drumbrughas; James, John, Joseph, Michael, and Philip in Drumsroohil; James in Mackan Glebe; and Patrick in Trustan Glebe. In addition, there were now two in Kinawley: Cormac in Tiravally Glebe; and Manus in Crocknacreevy. At least two Carrons were sponsors at the christenings of Catherine's children. Anne Carron was listed in 1842, 1844 and 1847. Cormac Carron was listed in 1844. Based on customary naming conventions, Catherine's father may have been James, the name given her second male child. Later male children which may have been named after Carrons include John, Michael, and Joseph. Catherine's only daughter, Catherine, could have been named after her own mother, herself, or both.

Catherine died on a Sunday. She was about 83-years-of-age. No tombstone has been found in either Kinawley or Glenfarne. 

Family

Edward Glancy (c 1800-7 Oct 1865)
Children
Last Edited28 Oct 2009

Citations

  1. [S167] Ireland civil death record.
  2. [S9] Surmised.

Edward Clancy

M, (1838 - 1920)
Edward Clancy, 1838-1920
FatherEdward Glancy (c 1800 - 1865)
MotherCatherine Carron Clancy (c 1801 - 1884)
RelationshipGrandfather of Helen Frances Gerber McCarthy
ChartsHelen Gerber ancestors
Glancy/Carron family
McNulty/Tracy family
Clancy/McNulty family
Birth*Dec 1838 Clonliffe, Kinawley, Fermanagh, Ireland1,2 
Christening23 Dec 1838 Kinawley, Fermanagh, Ireland2 
Anecdote*13 Oct 1865 (letter from brother Peter - 4 pages)
Marriage*2 Sep 1871 Saint Patrick's church, Hartland Tp, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US); Bride=Susan Ann McNulty Clancy, priest=John Carroll Rev, Witness=D. W. Nowlan, Witness=Margaret Prior3 
Death*14 Aug 1920 Woodstock, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US)4 
Burial*17 Aug 1920 Calvary Cemetery, Woodstock, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US)4,5 
Note*19 Aug 1920 obituary Woodstock (Illinois) Sentinel Thursday 19 August 1920 p12c1.1 
Biography* Edward Clancy, 1838-1920:
The fifth of nine children, Edward claimed that he was born the "night of the big wind" in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. This made for a good story, and there was, in fact, a horrific windstorm in County Fermanagh on 6 January 1939. However, according to Kinawley church records, Edward was christened two-weeks earlier on the 23rd of December in 1938. Edward's christening took place at the parish church in the village of Kinawley in County Fermanagh and was sponsored by Philip Dolan and Kitty M'Grath. The church building in which that sacrament was performed has since been replaced.

As he had with the story about his birth, Edward often time-fixed past events in his own life by relating them to other historical or newsworthy events. As in ... "that was the year that so-and-so ran for President." Alas, like with the story of his birth, these rememberances have not proven to be very accurate. Further, Edward's memory of dates hasn't proven to be much better. A case in point is his immigration to the U.S.A. and subsequent naturalization. Edward filed a declaration of his intention to become a citizen of the United States with the Clerk of Circuit Court at Woodstock in McHenry County on 13 June 1868. In this declaration, he declared that he left Liverpool, England on or about the 12th of June in 1863, arriving at the Port of New York in July. Edward was granted citizenship on the 19th of October in the same year that he declared; i.e., 1868.

If the U.S. laws governing naturalization were followed, Edward arrived in the United States at least five-years before naturalization; i.e., before 19 October 1863. This corresponds with his date of arrival as certified in his declaration of intent. However, he has not been found on any passenger list under a name even close to "Edward Clancy" and at an age that is plausible. It seems likely that Edward would remember the time of year he arrived - at least the season if not the month - even if he incorrectly remembered the year. But, the only Edward Clancy found in the passenger lists searched to date, that is plausible, not only crossed the great pond in October instead of June/July but crossed it in 1864 - not 1863 or earlier. If this Edward Clancy, who arrived at the Port of New York on 25 October 1864 aboard the "Belle Wood" is ours, then he apparently was not yet eligible for citizenship on the date that he actually recieved it. The declaration was sworn to by Edward before the Clerk of the Circuit Court. The application for citizenship included an affadavit from a John Donnelly attesting to the fact that he, John Donnelly, had known Edward Clancy for five-years-or-more and that during that time Edward had resided in the country continuously. Perhaps the declaration, application and affifavit were all the proof the judge required.

Edward, however, took citizenship and its responsibilities very seriously. He once cut short a trip to New York City so he could return home and vote in a party primary. And although Edward never learned to read or write, he was able to sign his name to his declaration of intent and citizenship papers.

In 1865, he received a letter from his brother Peter in Ireland with the news that their father had died. To whom this letter was posted or how it came to be in the possession of Edward is unknown.

When Edward came to McHenry County, following two brothers who had settled there eight years earlier, he took up residence in Woodstock and in 1870 was employed as a gardener. After his marriage in 1871, he graduated from gardening to farming and rented a succession of farms in the area. First, he farmed 160 acres in section 31 of Hebron Township on what was later called the Foreman farm. Then, he spent time on the 120 acre Lambert farm in section 21 of Hartland Township. Circa 1880, he moved to what was called, in 1920, the William McGraw farm in Richmond Township, staying there for seventeen years.

Edward's wife Susan died a week after giving birth in 1886. And the newborn was raised by a neighbor.6 Edward raised the other six by himself. At the time his wife died, they ranged in age from two to thirteen. Susan McNulty's funeral was held from the church in Richmond and she was buried in the cemetery next to the church (this according to her obituary). However, at some point, Edward purchased a large 10-grave plot in Calvary cemetery in Woodstock where a large tombstone has been erected to honor Susan (no tombstone is erected in the Richmond cemetery). According to the Calvary sexton records at Saint Marys in Woodstock, Susan is interred in this plot along with Edward himself and four of their sons. Saint Mary's records don't list occupants for the other four graves. The records are known to be incomplete but Susan's parents are probably in two of them. Both of their obituaries list Calvary as their burial places and there is no other record of their burials.

In 1889, Edward joined the Modern Woodmen of America, a popular fraternal life insurance society. He was a member of Camp 229 located in Woodstock, Illinois. Upon his death in 1920, the $2000 benefit was divided between children, Edward, T. Hugh, John, Martha and Mary. In December of 1897, at the age of 59 and 33 years after arriving in the Colonies, Edward bought a farm in Section 30 of Hebron township. He bought land from Albert C Manley on 1 Dec 1897, from Franklin Baird on 13 May 1898 and from Wm. J. Austin on 31 May 1898. By the end of that time, Edward had acquired a total of 130 acres in two parcels. The larger parcel of 90 acres included the Mauley homestead. He paid $6,776 total for the properties.

On 30 November 1907, Edward bought a house in Harvard City. The house, at 302 West Burbank between 2nd and 3rd, was built about 1900 and still stands. According to one of the current owners (in 2002), Bob Dapper, the house has never had additions, either added or removed, and has never been remuddled on the inside. Edward owned the house for almost six-years. We don't know who lived in the Harvard house. Edward apparently did not. He sold the house on 14 August 1913 for $3400 and is listed as a resident of Harvard at the sale. That's the first time since he bought the farm in 1897 that his residence is not listed as Hebron. He apparently continued to live in Harvard for another two years after the sale. Best guess - sometime after the marriage of his daughter Mary, Edward left the farm to live with his daughter Susan and her husband Frank Behringer in Harvard and then moved, with them, to Woodstock during 1915.

On 16 February 1915, Edward sold the farm for $16,375 except for a small piece which he sold on 21 December of that year for $175. He took back a mortgage on the farm, the interest from which helped finance his retirement. We don't know who operated the farm in the growing season between son Joseph's death in 1913 and the sale. Maybe Edward didn't like being a landlord. On 9 September 1915, Edward signed a will leaving his estate to his six children and to the three children of his deceased son Joseph. He left $1000 to son Edward, $2000 to daughter Susan Behringer, $3000 to daughter Martha Haley, $3500 to daughter Mary Gerber, $3500 to son John, $3250 to son T. Hugh, and $3750 to the three children of his deceased son Joseph. His son T. Hugh was appointed executor.

In 1916, Edward's brother John died in South Dakota. John left part of his estate to a brother Joseph who had come to the United States in 1868. Joseph's last known address was in New York City. Seventy-seven-year-old Edward Clancy traveled from his home in Woodstock, Illinois to New York to look for his brother whom he had not seen in 45 years. His son Terence Hugh accompanied him. They stayed for a week or more at 487 Lexington Avenue while they searched, unsuccessfully, for the missing brother. Edward was named in his brother John Clancy's will to a receive a one-third interest in the brother's 160-acre farm in Lynn Township, Lincoln County, South Dakota. On 5 July 1919, Edward sold his one-third interest in the farm to twins Fred and Henry Gerber of Worthing for $12,000.7

In the spring of 1917, Edward went to live with son Hugh in Chicago for a few months while daughter Martha in Woodstock was giving birth to a son. In 1919, Edward moved to the Resthaven sanitorium in Elgin, Illinois.

Edward, 81, died on a Saturday while visiting his daughter, Mrs. C.A. Haley, at her Judd Street home in Woodstock's 3rd Ward. The cause of death was old age. Arteria sclerosis, with which he had been afflicted for 15 years, was a contributory cause. He was survived by six of his eight children. Funeral services were held on Tuesday from Saint Mary's in Woodstock with the Rev. Keenan of Harvard assisting at the funeral mass. Pall bearers were Thomas Lawler, W. T. Slavin, Thomas O'Halleran, R. D. Croak, Timothy Leonard and George B. Haley. He was buried in Calvary Cemetery in Woodstock next to his wife, Susan McNulty. Others who attended from out of town were: M/M P. H. Haley, Mrs. J. P. Sullivan, Thomas & Peter Keenan, M/M John J. Clancy and Mrs. T. C. Nolan (all of Chicago); George B. Haley (Des Plaines); Mrs. George Meyers (Richmond) (Edward's former teacher); M/M A. J. Cole (Hebron); and Miss Nellie A. Kearns of New York City (Edward's niece).

We have made a number of trips to Counties Fermanagh and Leitrim in attempts to connect Edward Clancy more closely to our Irish roots. On one of these trips a Clancy cousin in Kinwaley put us onto a Clancy man living in a nursing home in Enniskillen where she worked. We went to visit this delightful gentleman and although we could not establish a family connection, the picture he graciously allowed us to take shows a marked resemblance to Edward.

Family

Susan Ann McNulty Clancy (26 Dec 1852-20 Mar 1886)
Children
Last Edited10 Jul 2017

Citations

  1. [S18] Obituary,.
  2. [S274] Kinawley christening record.
  3. [S159] McHenry county marriage record.
  4. [S66] McHenry county death record.
  5. [S265] Cemetery record, Calvary Cemetery, Woodstock, Illinois; Woodstock records at Saint Mary's.
  6. The neighbor was Michael O'Brien of Alden and his second wife, Mary Nolan. This family was closely related to the Clancys. Michael's daughter by his first wife, Isabelle O'Brien, married John J. Clancy. John J. was a son of Mary Nolan's sister Catherine and Edward Clancy's brother James.
  7. Recorded in Lincoln County Book 28 of Deeds, page 401.

John Clancy

M, (1837 - 1916)
FatherEdward Glancy (c 1800 - 1865)
MotherCatherine Carron Clancy (c 1801 - 1884)
RelationshipGranduncle of Helen Frances Gerber McCarthy
ChartsGlancy/Carron family
Birth*24 Jun 1837 Ireland1 
(godfather) Christening31 Jan 1864 Saint Patrick's Church, Hartland Tp, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US); Principal=John James Clancy2 
Will*24 Dec 1915  
Death*25 May 1916 Worthing, Lincoln, South Dakota (SD), United States (US); cancer of face1 
Burial*May 1916 Saint Edward's Cemetery, Worthing, Lincoln, South Dakota (SD), United States (US)3
Biography* John Clancy, 1837-1916:
John, the fourth born of nine, immigrated to the USA in late 1863 or early 1864. He arrived at Saint Patrick's church in Hartland Township, McHenry County, Illinois in time to be a sponsor at the christening of his brother James' son John on 31 January 1864. He remained in the area long enough to sponsor a child of James McCauley and Margaret Leonard4 in November of 1865 but he was not listed in the 1865 state census of McHenry County in June.

In 1871, John applied for 160 acres in Section 3 of Township 98 Range 50 of Lincoln County, Dakota Territory5 under the 1862 Homestead Act. His Homestead Application was number 2367. By law, he had to have been naturalized at the time of application. By 1876, he had constructed a house on the land that was 12 feet by 14 feet, one story high, with one door and one window. He had plowed and cultivated 25 acres of land, dug a well and planted three acres of forest trees. Having thus sufficiently improved his homestead to the satisfaction of the Bureau of Land Management he was granted Homestead Certificate 1328 for his land. The certificate was issued on 30 June 1876 during the presidency of Ullysses S. Grant and the 100th year of United States independence.

Also in 1876, the first school in the Worthing area was built on John's homestead, a structure built of sod. There were 30 students in the school representing the west portion of school district 27 and the east section of district 50. Students included many Gerbers living in the area; e.g., twins Henry F. Gerber and Fred Gerber, grandchildren of John's brother Edward, and their cousins Henry G. Gerber and Laura Gerber. Circa 1910, John retired to Worthing and rented a house. On 22 December 1910, he bought Lot 3/Block 5 in Worthing from Frank & Hattie Woodley for $250.

John, who never married, died testate in Lincoln County, South Dakota. His estate was approved for probate and the final decree was issued on 12 June 1918 at Probate Court in Canton. The inventory of his estate included:

- Homestead valued at $16,000.00

- Lot in Worthing, SD 200.00

- Cash on hand 290.25

- CD, State Bank of Worthing 2,522.93

Personal Property

- 1 bedstead 2.00

- 6 chairs 1.50

- 1 table 1.00

- 1 shot gun 4.00

- 1 cook stove .50

--------------

Total $19,022.18

Debts were estimated not to exceed $200.

The lot in the Village of Worthing, Lot 3 in Block 5, was bequeathed to Mary Clancy Gerber, daughter of his brother Edward. The personal property was bequeathed to his brother Edward. The homestead, cash and CD were split equally, one-third each, between his brother Edward, his nephew John Clancy, son of his brother James (and the deceased John's god son), and, Edward Clancy Davis, son of his brother Joseph. 
Last Edited18 Oct 2016

Citations

  1. [S157] Lincoln county death record.
  2. [S282] Saint Patrick's christening record.
  3. [S8] Tombstone.
  4. No known relationship between John and either of the parents but John's sister Catherine was married to a Leonard so there may have been a connection.
  5. In 1880, the Dakota Territory became the states of North & South Dakota

Terence Clancy

M, (1842 - )
FatherEdward Glancy (c 1800 - 1865)
MotherCatherine Carron Clancy (c 1801 - 1884)
RelationshipGranduncle of Helen Frances Gerber McCarthy
ChartsGlancy/Carron family
Birth*Jan 1842 Kinawley, Fermanagh, Ireland1 
Christening22 Jan 1842 Kinawley, Fermanagh, Ireland; godfather=Terrence Glancy1 
Immigration*c 1855 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (PA), United States (US)2 
Death*  
Biography* Terence Clancy, 1842-????:
The sixth of nine, Terence was christened at Kinawley on 22 January 1842. His sponsors were Terence Glancy (Ned's brother?) and Ann Carron (Kitty's sister?). Terence is not mentioned as living at home in Peter Clancy's 1865 letter advising brother's in the United States of their father's death. According to family lore, Terence immigrated to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the U.S.A. circa 1855 at age 13. 
Last Edited28 Oct 2009

Citations

  1. [S274] Kinawley christening record.
  2. [S1621] Family lore.

Michael Glancy

M, (1844 - 1874)
FatherEdward Glancy (c 1800 - 1865)
MotherCatherine Carron Clancy (c 1801 - 1884)
RelationshipGranduncle of Helen Frances Gerber McCarthy
ChartsGlancy/Carron family
Birth*Jul 1844 Kinawley, Fermanagh, Ireland1 
Christening17 Jul 1844 Kinawley, Fermanagh, Ireland1 
Immigration*c 1862 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (PA), United States (US) 
(Witness) Death1 Feb 1869 Clontymore, Kinawley, Fermanagh, Ireland; Deceased=Terrence Glancy2 
Death*10 Jul 1874 Crocknacreevy, Kinawley, Fermanagh, Ireland; Witness=John Leonard2 
Biography* Michael Clancy, 1844-1874:
The seventh of nine, Michael was christened at Kinawley on 17 July 1844. Sponsors were Cormac Carron and Anne Carron (his mother's siblings?). Michael, according to family lore, immigrated to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the USA circa 1862. He must have returned to Ireland before 1865 because he was mentioned as living at home in Peter Clancy's 1865 letter advising the brothers in the United States of their father's death. Also, a Mick Glancy of Knocknacrieve (sic) was present at the death of a 50-year-old tailor named Terence Glancy on 1 February 1869 in Clontymore, Kinawley Parish, County Fermanagh. Mick Glancy may have been our Michael Glancy. Terence Glancy may have been Michael's uncle.

Michael died at home on a Friday, several days before his 30th birthday, after a six-month illness. His death record lists the cause of death as phthisis. Am not sure what this term would have meant in 1874 Ireland but it is from a Greek word that means to waste away. If his lungs were infected, Michael probably died of TB. Brother-in-law John Leonard was present at his death. 
Last Edited17 Oct 2016

Citations

  1. [S274] Kinawley christening record.
  2. [S167] Ireland civil death record.

Peter Clancy

M, (1847 - b 1917)
FatherEdward Glancy (c 1800 - 1865)
MotherCatherine Carron Clancy (c 1801 - 1884)
RelationshipGranduncle of Helen Frances Gerber McCarthy
ChartsGlancy/Carron family
Birth*May 1847 Kinawley, Fermanagh, Ireland1 
ChristeningMay 1847 Kinawley, Fermanagh, Ireland; godfather=Terrence Glancy1 
Note*23 Oct 1865 letter from Peter to unnamed brothers in the U.S.A. dated 23 Oct 1865
Death*b 1917 2 
Biography* Peter Clancy 1847-????:
The eighth of nine, Peter was christened at Kinawley on 12 May 1847. His sponsors were Terence Clancy (father's brother?) and Ann Carron (mother's sister?). Peter was in Crocknacreevy when his father died in 1865. Shortly after the father's death, Peter wrote a letter to unnamed brothers in the USA advising them of their father's death. After brother Michael died in 1874, the mother Kitty asked the youngest son Joseph to come from New York City and take over the farm. This suggests that Peter, who would have been 27 at the time, had left home, was deceased or, couldn't take over the farm for some other reason. Peter was not listed in County Fermanagh in 1901 and apparently was not alive in 1917 when brother John Clancy's probate file was being settled. Nothing else about Peter is known. 
Last Edited17 Oct 2016

Citations

  1. [S274] Kinawley christening record.
  2. [S275] John Clancy, Probate File, Clerk of County Court,.

Joseph Clancy

M, (1850 - 1904)
Joseph Clancy, 1850-1904
FatherEdward Glancy (c 1800 - 1865)
MotherCatherine Carron Clancy (c 1801 - 1884)
RelationshipGranduncle of Helen Frances Gerber McCarthy
ChartsGlancy/Carron family
Birth*Apr 1850 Kinawley, Fermanagh, Ireland1 
Christening27 Apr 1850 Kinawley, Fermanagh, Ireland1 
(Witness) Death7 Oct 1865 Crocknacreevy, Kinawley, Fermanagh, Ireland; Deceased=Edward Glancy2 
Marriage*23 Feb 1879 Saint Andrew's, New York, New York (NY), United States (US); Bride=Bridget Agnes O'Reilly Clancy Davis, priest=P. S. Rigney Rev, Witness=Timothy O'Connor, Witness=Rose O'Reilly3 
Death*14 Apr 1904 Gouverneur Hospital, New York, New York (NY), United States (US)3 
Burial*26 Apr 1904 City Cemetery, New York, New York (NY), United States (US)3 
Biography* Joseph Clancy, 1850-1904:
The last of the nine children born to Ned Clancy and Kitty Carron, Joseph was christened at Kinawley on 27 April 1850. His sponsors were James Glancy and Ann Glancy. Most of what we know about Joseph Clancy comes from his brother John's probate file, either directly or by inference. When brother John Clancy died in 1916, brother Edward hadn't heard from Joseph since 1871. But, since Joseph was named to inherit one-third of John's estate, an heroic effort was made to find him by Edward, who was also to receive a one-third share. Edward had his son Terrence Hugh write to relatives in both Ireland and America asking if anyone knew where Joseph was or how to contact him. Hugh also wrote to several Joseph Clancy's in New York City, Syracuse, New York and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Hugh thought he remembered seeing a letter his father had received from a Joseph postmarked Pittsburgh. All with no luck.

Edward and Hugh then embarked on a trip to New York City and conducted a search from there. They were in the New York City area for 28 days. And as a direct result of the extensive, intensive search conducted by Terrence Hugh, the surviving widow and only son of Joseph were located in Brooklyn, Kings County, New York. Other relatives, friends and acquaintances of both Joseph and his wife were discovered along the way. The widow, the son, and a few of the others subsequently gave depositions and/or testified at hearings. Some of their views and opinions came to light through the later testimony of Terrence Hugh. The story that follows is based on those depositions and testimonies. It's a sad story that is necessarily biased by the opinions of those who told the tale. We'll never hear Joseph's side of it, God rest him.

Joseph Clancy was about five-foot-seven-inches tall, was pale and thin (160-165 pounds), with black hair and dark blue eyes. "Quite a swell" as one depondent put it. Joseph was a very private, reserved person who maintained almost no contact with family members. His brother Edward didn't know that Joseph had married before he and Hugh made the New York trip. Edward, obviously then, didn't know that Joseph had children. And, of course, neither Edward nor brother John knew that Joseph had died in 1904. Joseph wrote and asked Edward for money at least twice before he married. The letter that he wrote to Edward in 1871 was the last contact that Edward had from him and the only address that Edward knew. Joseph and wife Bridget were visited by his brother Patrick once in the 1870's. Patrick was returning to Ireland and wanted Joseph to come with him. An unnamed brother in Ireland was 'after dying' and Patrick wanted Joseph to take the farm. His mother wrote to him during this period also asking him to come home and take the farm, but Joseph wouldn't go. Joseph did not keep in touch with men who considered themselves to be his good friends either. Most were business associates and none knew where he lived or if he was married. When contacted in 1916 most hadn't seen him in ten years or more (not surprising given that he died in 1904).

Joseph arrived in the United States in 1868. On 19 Oct 1871, when he wrote the letter to brother Edward, he was living at 189 Chambers Street in New York City with a distant relative named Ellen McPartland. He and a John McPartland were both boarders at that place. The relation, if any, between John McPartland, the boarder, and Ellen McPartland, the boardee, isn't known. Joseph met Bridget O'Reilly circa 1872. When they married in 1879, Bridget "went against her people." The wedding may have been hastily arranged because Bridget lived with her parents for about six weeks after the marriage until Joseph could find and furnish a place for them to live. They set up housekeeping at 40th Street and 2nd Avenue and it was there that a daughter, Catherine, was born in 1880. Sometime after the marriage, Joseph began to drink to excess. He was employed mostly in the wholesale clothing industry as a salesman. Jobs, which never lasted more than a year, were interspersed with periods, sometimes long periods, of unemployment. It's not clear why the jobs were lost. He may have quit them, he may have lost them because of poor performance, they may have been temporary or seasonal in nature and not permanent, or for some other reason like race discrimination. Although he didn't speak with a brogue, most associates suspected he was not an American and some thought he was born in Ireland. However, each successive job was farther down the clothing industry ladder. In the beginning, the firms that hired him were the larger Broadway houses. Later, the firms were the smaller East Broadway houses. Eventually he was 'frozen-out' almost altogether. This work history suggests that quitting or poor performance were more likely reasons for Joseph's constantly changing jobs rather than race discrimination. Although during this period, at least, he did not have a reputation as a drunk among his business associates. Perhaps, if Joseph did quit these jobs, the firms just wouldn't hire him back later.

By 1882, the year son Edward was born, the Clancy's had moved to Brooklyn. By 1884, a house had been purchased at 60 Cedar Street in Brooklyn. The house was owned, with mortgage, by Bridget. When son Edward was about six months old, daughter Catherine tipped over in her highchair and struck her head. She subsequently developed spinal meningitis and died. Whether this tragedy was contributory or not, Joseph's drinking grew steadily worse. The relationship between he and Bridget deteriorated steadily as well. She accused him of associating with other women, with one in particular. He accused her of associating with five other men. One night, he attempted to hit her with a pitcher. On another occasion he woke her from a sound sleep and was standing over her, threatening her with an axe. In 1886, he forced Bridget to sign a separation agreement. He had stopped providing any support to the family, although he did work sometimes and he continued to live, although not continuously, at the Cedar Street address until 1891. After Joseph left, he returned only once. On that visit, he told his son that he loved him and asked Edward if he would like to go away with him. Little Edward, however, wanted his father to stay with him and his mother. So, Joseph left - alone. That was the last time that Edward saw his father. Joseph never contacted either his wife or his son again. Predictably, his health began to decline and he eventually contracted consumption. In the last years he lived in cheap hotels on the Bowery in Manhattan.

And then, at 11:20 p.m. on Wednesday 13 April 1904, Joseph was found, sick and destitute, lying on the ground at Bowery and Grand Streets by patrolman Patrick Cotter of the 12th Precinct. Joseph was taken by ambulance to Gouvernuer Hospital in New York City where he died at 5 p.m. the next day. Cause of death was listed as tuberculosis-pulmonary with contributory alcoholism. He was attended by Dr. P. W. Monroe. He was buried in City Cemetery on 26 April 1904 with only his friend Patrick Farley to mourn him. Requiescat In Pace....

The photograph is a copy of one in his brother John's probate file. It is marked as Exhibit A in a deposition taken from Mary McPartland in Middlesex county, New Jersey on 13 September 1917. 

Family

Bridget Agnes O'Reilly Clancy Davis (c 1849-14 Dec 1924)
Children
Last Edited28 Oct 2009

Citations

  1. [S274] Kinawley christening record.
  2. [S167] Ireland civil death record.
  3. [S275] John Clancy, Probate File, Clerk of County Court,.

Edward Aaron Clancy Jr

M, (1872 - 1961)
Edward A. Clancy, 1872-1961
FatherEdward Clancy (1838 - 1920)
MotherSusan Ann McNulty Clancy (1852 - 1886)
RelationshipUncle of Helen Frances Gerber McCarthy
ChartsClancy/McNulty family
Birth*6 Apr 1872 Richmond, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US)1 
Marriage*30 Jan 1913 Bride=Sarah A. Curry Clancy 
Death*29 Aug 1961 St.Joseph's Hospital, Elgin, Kane, Illinois (IL), United States (US)1 
Note* obituary - date and newspaper unknown1 
Burial*1 Sep 1961 Calvary Cemetery, Woodstock, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US)2,1 
Biography* Edward Clancy, 1872-1961:
Edward, the eldest of eight, was probably born in Hebron Township and not in Richmond. He completed four-years of high school and as a young man, worked as a farm laborer on the Will Hooper farm in Alden. In 1910, Edward was working as a farmer at the Elgin State Hospital and living on the property. A total of 1624 people, staff and inmates, were in residence. Later his wife Sarah would work there as a cook. In 1920, Edward and Sarah were renting at her parent's home at 133 Oak Street in Elgin. Edward was working in a butter factory. By 1930, the couple owned a $6,000 house at 535 Hendee and had a radio. They also were renting to a family of three for $35/month. Edward was working for a public utility. By 1940, Edward was retired. The house was now valued at $3,500. He was a member of Modern Woodmen of America. According to his obit, Edward was employed by Chicago, Aurora & Elgin Railroad for many years. Have found no evidence supporting that claim.

Edward, 89, of 535 Hendee Street, died on a Tuesday night at Saint Joseph Hospital after a week's illness. He was survived by his widow Sarah, three sisters, Mrs Henry Gerber of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Mrs C A Haley of Algoma, Wisconsin, and Mrs Frank Behringer of San Pedro, California. His funeral was held on Friday from the O'Connor funeral home and then from Saint Mary's church in Elgin. Edward was buried in Woodstock, McHenry County, Illinois with his parents and three brothers. His wife Sarah is buried in Elgin. 
Last Edited18 Aug 2017

Citations

  1. [S18] Obituary,.
  2. [S265] Cemetery record, Calvary Cemetery, Woodstock, Illinois; Woodstock records at Saint Mary's.

Terrance Hugh Clancy

M, (1873 - 1921)
T. Hugh Clancy, 1873-1921
FatherEdward Clancy (1838 - 1920)
MotherSusan Ann McNulty Clancy (1852 - 1886)
RelationshipUncle of Helen Frances Gerber McCarthy
ChartsClancy/McNulty family
Nickname T. Hugh 
Nickname Hugh 
Birth*10 Aug 1873 Woodstock, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US)1 
(usher) Marriage18 Nov 1907 Saint Joseph's, Harvard, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US); Bride=Susan Mae Clancy Behringer, Groom=Frank George Behringer2,3
(usher) Marriage6 Oct 1909 Saint Patrick's church, Hartland Tp, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US); Bride=Martha Agnes Clancy Haley, Groom=Cornelius Alphonsus Haley2,3 
Death*22 May 1921 Chicago, Cook, Illinois (IL), United States (US)4 
Burial*24 May 1921 Calvary Cemetery, Woodstock, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US)5,1 
Note*26 May 1921 obituary Woodstock (Illinois) Sentinel, Thursday 26 May 19211 
Biography* Terrance Hugh Clancy, 1873-1921:
There are inconsistencies in records of Terrance Hugh's birthdate. His obituary lists his birth date as 10 August 1873. His death record lists it as 21 August 1873. From his age on the death record, his birthdate calculates as 1 September 1873. Although his obituary lists his birthplace as Woodstock, Terrance Hugh was probably born in Hebron Township or Hartland Township and not in Woodstock. Named Terrance Hugh at birth, after 1900 he was usually referred to as Hugh or T. Hugh. Hugh grew up in Hebron Township. He attended school in Genoa Junction, Wisconsin and then taught school for a number of terms. After his stint at teaching, he attended Beloit College where he was a member of the football team. He moved to Kansas City, Missouri for a time and when he returned to Woodstock he worked as an aligner at the Oliver Typewriter factory. During this time, Hugh was a boarder with Robert and Alice McLean at 344 Tryon Street in Woodstock's 4th Ward. By 1913, he had moved to Chicago where he was a lodger with the widow Emma Cashery at 114 East Superior Street in the 21st Ward. He worked in the office of a wholesale grocery. He took a law course at Northwestern University and later was employed as a clerk at First National Bank.

Hugh developed chronic nephritis in 1919. He subsequently developed uremia and underwent an operation on 10 May 1921. Hugh died of these diseases at Chicago Policlinic and Hospital at 221 West Chicago Avenue in the 21st Ward twelve days later on a Sunday. He was survived by two brothers and three sisters. The funeral was held at Saint Mary's in Woodstock on Tuesday where the Rev. D. J. Conway officiated. At the time of his death, Hugh's estate consisted of two lots in Chicago plus cash and receivables of $5505.78. He died intestate, that is, without a will. The settlement of Hugh's estate was the more complicated because Hugh was the administrator of his father's estate which had not as yet been settled. Brother-in-law Cornelius Haley assumed administrator duties for both estates. The father's estate was settled first and, through a clerical error, an excess of $1161.38 was distributed to the heirs. This error was discovered before Hugh's estate was settled and the judge decided to have Hugh's estate repay the $1161.38 excess distribution to the father's estate. In the final distribution, each of the surviving five siblings received $566.87. The sixth share was divided equally among the three children of the deceased sibling Joseph. The Final Report to the Probate Court, McHenry County, Illinois on Estate File No. 7587 was approved on 18 December 1922. 
Last Edited19 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S18] Obituary,.
  2. [S159] McHenry county marriage record.
  3. [S1597] Newspaper item.
  4. [S271] Cook county death record.
  5. [S265] Cemetery record, Calvary Cemetery, Woodstock, Illinois; Woodstock records at Saint Mary's.

John Daniel Clancy

M, (1875 - 1952)
John D. Clancy, 1875-1952
FatherEdward Clancy (1838 - 1920)
MotherSusan Ann McNulty Clancy (1852 - 1886)
RelationshipUncle of Helen Frances Gerber McCarthy
ChartsClancy/McNulty family
Birth*6 Aug 1875 Woodstock, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US)1 
(Witness) Marriage4 Oct 1905 Saint Patrick's church, Hartland Tp, McHenry, Illinois (IL), United States (US); Groom=Joseph Abden Clancy, Bride=Nita H. Giddings Clancy Oakes Burns2 
Marriage*1 Jan 1908 Bride=Lucy Milicent White Clancy 
Death*18 Aug 1952 West Suburban Hospital, Oak Park, Cook, Illinois (IL), United States (US); Cerebro-Vascular accident1 
Note*19 Aug 1952 death notice Chicago (Illinois) Daily Tribune, Tuesday 19 August 1952 p22c5.3 
Cremation*20 Aug 1952 Woodlawn, Forest Park, Illinois (IL), United States (US)1 
Biography* John D. Clancy, 1875-1952:
Born in McHenry County, Illinois probably in either Hebron or Hartland Townships,4 John grew up on farms in those areas. By 1900 he had entered college and after graduation practiced law in the City of Chicago. John married Lucy Milicent White of Boone County in 1908 and in 1909 the happy couple was living at 5558 Lexington in Chicago. By 1912, they had purchased a home, with mortgage, at 280 Blackhawk Road in Riverside, Cook County. When John registered for the WWI draft in 1918, he was a lawyer with a private practice with an office in the Otis Elevator Building at 10 South LaSalle in Chicago. John was described as being tall in height, of slender build with light blue eyes and dark brown hair. Later, he became a Justice-of-the-Peace. John developed a love of the land during his childhood on the farm in McHenry County and retained this love into adulthood. He and Milicent owned farms in Lake and Wexford Counties in Michigan where they vacationed with their children.

John, age 77, died on a Monday at West Suburban hospitak in Oak Park, Illinois as the result of a stroke suffered nine days earlier. He was at home in Riverside, working in the family garden, at the time of the attack. Cause of death was a cerebro-vascular accident, hypertension and arteriosclerosis. John was attended by Dr Merle J Denker of East Avenue in Riverside. He was survived by his wife Milicent, two sons - Gates W and John D jr, two daughters Mrs Catherine Popejoy and Mrs Milicent Jones and nine grandchildren. Services were held at the Ivins Funeral Home chapel at 80 Burlington Road, Riverside, on Wedneday. His burial was private. 

Family

Lucy Milicent White Clancy (20 Apr 1883-4 Feb 1972)
Children
Last Edited21 Aug 2017

Citations

  1. [S271] Cook county death record.
  2. [S159] McHenry county marriage record.
  3. [S18] Obituary,.
  4. his father was living in Hebron Township in 1872, in Hartland Township in 1877.